Start Doctor patient dating laws

Doctor patient dating laws

Suppose our small-town doctor becomes smitten with a local beau or belle.

So if our doctor starts "seeing" a local woman or man, he or she risks running afoul of the "no overlap" rule.

So, our doctor has the option of dating only residents of the next county or ordering a bride or groom by mail.

The subject of physician-patient boundaries illustrates how well-intentioned policy can be written in a way that is simply too shallow to serve the goals of ethics.

If you've sat on a credentials committee, disciplinary panel, or medical-licensing board, you surely reviewed cases of physician-patient sexual involvement.

Saving the network from "leakage" isn't worth the unpleasantness of participating in a sexual boundary suit.

Plans and physician groups should look at their internal norms and written policies, and consider how they'd respond to such scenarios, given current administrative standards.

Rules are always problematic, especially those that address highly complex human behaviors.

I would argue, I think with good support, that love and mating entail the greatest complexity of anything we do as a species.

Like the AMA, Colorado doesn't specify how long after a romantic relationship ceases a medical one might begin, stating only that they must not be "concurrent." Other states address — or do not address — this issue with varying degrees of explicitness.

Mental health professionals set even stricter standards.

We need to rise above the cynical view that love cannot exist, and sex must be abusive and transient, between people with power disparities. Actual outcomes, of course, are harder to measure than whether a certain action has been taken—checking the feet of a patient with diabetes, for example.